International Journal of Advanced Educational Research

International Journal of Advanced Educational Research


International Journal of Advanced Educational Research
International Journal of Advanced Educational Research
Vol. 7, Issue 2 (2022)

Genome characterization of the “Eaglepride” phage


Niyati Kottury, John Leddo

M. abscessus is a complex pulmonary disease progresses with persistent symptoms leading to decline of pulmonary function, and impaired quality of life; In some cases, the disease can also cause acute respiratory failure and death due to drug/antibiotic resistance. Previous research confirmed that the isolated mycobacteriophage “Eaglepride” will also be able to infect and kill M. abscessus, as the M. abscessus and M. smegmatis bacteria are closely related. Mycobacterium smegmatis is used in place of M. abscessus, as it is a non-pathogenic, ubiquitous bacterium of the same genus that can be experimented with in a regular lab. The current research hypothesis is to determine if the genome sequence of the “Eaglepride” has the potential to be applied for human Phage Therapy treatment. The databases DNA master and Phamerator, softwares such as TMHMM and SOSUI were utilized, genome validation with other databases such NCBI BLAST and HHPRED, and coding potential for genome was determined with GeneMark, GeneMarkS and Starterator. In Eaglepride, genome sequencing located a functional integrase gene (gp 35) in the genome. This gene in a bacteriophage helps the phage become a provirus; once the phage attaches to the host cell surface, it utilizes its tail to inject its genome into the bacterial cell. Before it does this, however, gp 35 is used to facilitate integration of the tail into the bacterial cell membrane through its production of the enzyme integrase. Through gp35’s production of integrase, Eaglepride can successfully integrate into host bacterial genomes, although the gene coding is less than ideal for human phage therapy use. Currently, phage-encoded lysins are being investigated for their potential as antimicrobial agents. For future studies, one can clone these lysin genes from Eaglepride phage, purify the lysin protein and investigate their potential as an antimicrobial agent, and test it against mycobacteria that cause human diseases such as Tuberculosis and Leprosy.
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How to cite this article:
Niyati Kottury, John Leddo. Genome characterization of the “Eaglepride” phage. International Journal of Advanced Educational Research, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2022, Pages 32-41
International Journal of Advanced Educational Research International Journal of Advanced Educational Research